07 September 2014

Brief update & a biking recollection

It has been almost a week since my last confession here. I've been working on two enormous text projects that take up all of my free time.

My daily habit is:

  1. finish my drudge work;
  2. finish my text work;
  3. treat myself to the films of Quentin Dupieux.

I've now marveled at all three of Dupieux's English-language movies MULTIPLE TIMES because I love them — I'll try to remember to praise them in greater depth (& continually) in future entries.

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A BIKING RECOLLECTION

Here's a recollection that just came to me. It's about one aspect of a bike ride that I experienced yesterday.

I own a mountain bike. I ride this bike in my neighborhood. I stop at all of the stop signs. — Those are the givens. Now here is the event that happened:

One of the stop signs that I stopped at was infested with schoolchildren (specifically, bus patrols wielding orange flags) who were manning its vicinity.

I stopped at this stop sign, as usual. Then, when the coast was clear and the intersection seemed safe to travel thru, I pressed down with all of my body's weight upon the bike's right pedal. My intention was to go forward.

Here is the thing that I want to stress: My shoes' soles were a little wet from walking in the grass (earlier I had dismounted my bike and walked in the grass briefly, to enjoy the feeling of the morning dew touching my shoes' soles) — so, when I pressed down with all of my body's weight on the right pedal, the sole of my shoe slipped drastically, being wet with dew (morning dew is like a natural lubricant), and I wobbled and almost fell down onto the pavement.

The reason that the above incident stuck with me and became a firm recollection rather than a hazy half-memory is that it was embarrassing. Embarrassing events, I've learned, are hard to forget.

In conclusion, I was unable to impress those children by pedaling thru the intersection on my mountain bike with style and control — instead, I almost fell down.

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